• FAQs

    We often get questions about elements of the transportation system, such as signs, signals, lighting and pavement markings. We also receive inquiries about laws and rules and use of the public right-of-way.

    The pages in this section include answers to some of those frequently asked questions (FAQs). The following FAQs include an educational video series called “On the Move with Bellevue Transportation.” 

    If you have a suggested FAQ, please share it with us using the contact information listed on this page.

    Residents are often unaware of who is responsible for managing overgrown vegetation. Garrett Marr, a streets maintenance group crew leader, explains that it is a shared responsibility.

    A thumbnail of a video about vegetation in the right of way. Click to watch the video.

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    Darcy Akers, transportation engineer, explains that it is legal to turn left on a flashing yellow arrow but there’s more you need to know.

    A thumbnail of a video about turn signals. Click to watch the video.

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    Bellevue residents often ask how they can request a new sidewalk, crosswalk or streetlight. Kristi Oosterveen, neighborhood sidewalk program manager, explains the process.

    A thumbnail of a video about crosswalks. Click to watch the video.

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    More information on sidewalks, crosswalks and street lights.
     

    Neighborhood Traffic Safety Services staff work with neighbors on ways to address excessive traffic safety concerns. Linda Glas, project manager, explains how you can request a speed bump, traffic circle or residential parking zone.

    A thumbnail of a video about speedbumps. Click to watch the video.

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    Monty Vea, streets program lead worker, shares how you can call or email the Bellevue Service Center so that a work order can be created for your street or sidewalk maintenance request.

    A city worker stands in front of a street maintenance truck on a side street

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    The city has several tools available to find out about what projects are planned or being built in your neighborhood. Cheryl Terry, administrative assistant, explains how you can reach out to city departments to become involved and informed.

    Photo of Cheryl Terry, Administrative Assistant Transportation Department

     

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    There’s a great deal of public and private construction happening in Bellevue which often impacts your travel. Marie Jensen, public involvement manager, explains how to stay informed so you travel safely.

    On the Move Video Series - Road Closure - Thumbnail

     

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    Residents often ask the city what and where is the public right-of-way in relation to their property line. Savana Makepeace, engineering technician, explains.

    A city worker stands in front of a house on the sidewalk

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    If you ever notice a street sign in Bellevue city limits that needs repair, Brian Johnson, program lead worker, tells you how to report it.

    A city worker stands in front of a stop sign and street sign on a residential street

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    If you happen to see a damaged or non-working traffic signal, streetlight or any of the lighted fixtures, please report it immediately. Bret Tredway, traffic signal crew chief, tells you how.

    A city worker stands in front of a traffic signal control cabinet at an intersection

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    Construction of the six East Link light rail stations and trackway in Bellevue began in 2016. Learn when most of it will be substantially completed and when light rail will be running in Bellevue. Tim Kariel, project manager for Bellevue Transportation, explains.

    Photo of T Kariel, East Link project manager, Bellevue Transportation Dept

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    • What, where, when: These signs indicate that a driver should not stop a 
      Image of No Parking Stopping Standing Any Time sign
       vehicle for any reason in the area defined by the signs. They apply to all hours of the day and days of the week regardless of whether they say “anytime.” They are typically used on busy arterial roadways where stopping a vehicle in a travel lane for any reason creates a significant safety hazard for the driver or the drivers of other vehicles on the road. 
    • Enforcement and penalties: These signs are addressed by the state under RCW 46.61.570 (https://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=46.61.570) and Bellevue City Code 11.23.025 (https://bellevue.municipal.codes/BCC/11.23.025). A Police officer or contracted parking enforcement employee can issue a ticket for parking, stopping or standing in these designated areas. The penalty for a “NO PARKING STOPPING STANDING ANYTIME” zone violation was $44 as of Jan. 1, 2020.
    • Definitions: "Parking" is the act of stopping the vehicle and leaving the vehicle for any length of time; "Standing" is the act of stopping a vehicle and waiting in it to pick up or drop off people or packages; and "Stopping" is the act of stopping the vehicle for any reason other than if directed to stop by police.